US EVA-44

The first of three spacewalks took place on Oct 5, 2017 to service the Space Station’s Robotic Arm (Canadarm2). Astronauts Randy Bresnik (EV1-red stripes) and Mark Vande Hei (no stripes) from Expedition 53, ventured outside the station exiting the Quest Airlock and starting a series of tasks in order to replace the end-effector A or LEE A of Canadarm2.

The following photos are from my AXM ISS papermodel and paper astronauts to represent the actual US EVA-44. For those who have assembled the ISS paper model, there is no need to make any changes to the model. This is only a demonstration.

These are important elements related to this EVA. The Mobile Base System (MBS) and its POA (Payload/Orbital Replacement Unit Accomodation). The CETA cart and the P1 truss worksite.

Another view of the area.

Canadarm2 with both End-Effectors A and B. Notice the blue stripe at one end that corresponds to Latching End Effector B (LEE B). The LEE A is the faulty latching end-effector that will be replaced during this EVA.

EVA worksite for the astronauts

Removing degraded LEE A from Canadarm2 at P1 truss

Canadarm2 is being translated towards the P1 worksite where the astronauts have set their worksites in preparation for this first task.

Astronauts Bresnik (EV1) and Vande Hei (EV2) getting ready for the approaching End-Effector A.

The robot arm is being positioned in between the astronauts.

The astronauts removed insulation from the End-Effector and loosened the bolts so the LEE A can be removed.

The LEE A has been removed.

Temporary stowage of LEE A on CETA cart

The degraded LEE A is now shown temporarily placed on the CETA cart.

Remove POA LEE from MBS

Then the astronauts started working on the POA in order to remove it from the MBS.

Installation of POA LEE on Canadarm2

Now the POA LEE has been installed on the station’s arm.

Installing degraded LEE A onto MBS

The degraded LEE A is seen here in its new location on the MBS. It will eventually return to Earth via a Dragon capsule for repairs.

The astronauts were ahead of schedule and were able to complete some “get-ahead” tasks before returning to the airlock.

Source: Spaceflightnow.com and Spaceflight101.com

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